Archive for the ‘affordable homes in Orlando’ Category

h1

Show me the money – from contract to close on a home…

July 16, 2013

In today’s real estate world…financing is critical. It is often the difference between deal or no deal. So, how do you make it work? There are a number of factors to consider:

1. Is the buyer’s lender local and reputable?
2. Has the buyer been pre-APPROVED?
3. Is there a significant down payment?
4. Will the house appraise?

Without a yes answer to the above questions, your contract could be in jeopardy. It is always important to work with a lender who properly qualifies prospects, No ambiguous language allowed on that pre-approval letter (look for the “out” clauses”)! Make sure you actually talk to the lender and find out the specifics on the borrower. Is the buyer putting down some funds…money talks in this market and deals are done when the buyer has contributed to the bottom line. Finally, is the home priced right? In today’s market…we don’t want to be a part of the problem. We have to be problem solvers!

h1

Holy cow – there are no homes to sell…

January 30, 2013

house sideways

Things have gotten a wee bit strange in real estate recently. There are simply too few homes for sale. I have buyers…lots of buyers actually but there is an absolutely nothing to show them. If you want a home in the $200,000 to $350,000 price range in a good area of Orlando then you had better be prepared to look a long time and jump on something the minute it becomes available. I’m seeing multiple offers on homes listed and anxious agents who want contracts signed before it is too late. There is definitely a sense of urgency in the Orlando real estate marketplace.

What does this mean? The economy is affecting homes listed for sale as potential sellers fear they won’t obtain fair market value for their home. The majority of homes for sale in Orlando remain short sales or foreclosures. We need to see the inventory of distress sales dwindle and more normal market conditions return.

What is normal? Who knows? But this certainly isn’t it.

h1

March Madness – Home Affordability Bracket

March 21, 2011

 

March Madness is finally here. At Coldwell Banker we love our college towns, and those locales with teams in the Big Dance are abuzz right now with tournament fever.

While everyone rushes to fill out their brackets, Coldwell Banker for the second straight year is giving you the Bracket of Affordability. This bracket fills out the projected tournament winner by advancing the school that resides in the most affordable real estate market according to the median price for homes that are currently on the market that appear on coldwellbanker.com.

Last year, the Coldwell Banker Bracket of Affordability picked Syracuse as its tournament champ, and this year we have another great shot at picking the right winner with Kansas ending up as the overall champ. Lawrence, Kansas has the most affordable real estate market of the tournament field with a media home price of $106,855.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, UC-Santa Barbara boasts the most expensive college market with a median price of $2.7 million. The final four includes Indiana St. ($127,212), Florida ($108,873), and Memphis ($111,650).

We’ll be tracking the success of the Coldwell Banker Bracket of Affordability throughout the tournament to see just how accurate the picks are. Find out more about how affordable college markets are by checking out the College Home Listing Report on coldwellbanker.com.

…courtesy of Coldwell Banker

h1

Real Estate Mind Games

August 21, 2010

 

Success seems to be connected with action. Successful people keep moving. They make mistakes, but they don’t quit.” Conrad Hilton

 

Real estate today is moving and changing in new directions. To be a winner in today’s real estate world, you have to put the past behind you and move toward the future. You have to be an agent that wants to win and then sets out to figure out what it will take to make transactions matter.

It’s all a mind game and you must have a winning mindset. If you don’t – you are doomed to fail.

I am constantly reminded how tough our economic climate is and how bad home prices have fallen. But I am also reminded that we are not the only generation to have financial challenges. Many of our grandparents and parents suffered greatly during the “great depression” and they think we are all being a wee bit dramatic. I know it is tough out there but I also know that opportunities exist to those who don’t give up and keep moving toward a goal.

Will real estate ever be the same? No. But how can we expect it to remain the same? It’s changed for good and I don’t think that is all bad news. It’s just our reality and it is time we deal with it. I heard today that nearly a quarter of Americans think their home is going to fall in value this year and yet I also heard that nearly a quarter of Americans are going to put their homes on the market the first sign of change.

Be the change – start thinking about winning in a hard market. What have we got to lose because our days are full of opportunities! Keep a positive mindset and be prepared to WIN. I believe it for you.

h1

When smaller is better – house downsizing

May 30, 2009

Is it me or is everything getting smaller?

I know this a luxury blog but luxury no longer equals HUGE. Lavish displays of extravagant wealth are no longer de rigueur. You can be opulent and tastefully small.

I have watched, with our current market conditions, as homeowners are downsizing in record numbers. People still want to be surrounded by beautiful things – just not so much of them. Maybe there is too much of a good thing.

I have also watched people who had extraordinary home settle for something sweet and simple. When the world around you is teetering, just a bit, it is good to have something that is warm and cozy and feels like home.

In the end, this may not be a bad thing at all. Luxury in a box, a delicious, delightful and small box. I think I may try it myself.

h1

Orlando housing market – Surge in sales of lower-priced homes indicate a healing housing market

May 11, 2009

orlando1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(May 11, 2009 – Orlando, FL)

Members of the Orlando Regional REALTOR® Association in April sold nearly seven times more homes in the lower-price range categories than in the upper categories, which according to economists is typical of a rebounding market.

“Orlando’s housing market appears to be following a recognized healing pattern — from the bottom up — as evidenced by the greater number of sales in the lower-price categories,” explains ORRA President Les Simmonds, L.G. Simmonds Real Estate Corp. ”For example 75 percent of homes sold in April were purchased for less than $200,000, while 10 percent sold for more than $300,000. And, we expect the ratio of sales of lower-priced homes to increase exponentially as more and more first-time homebuyers seek to take advantage of the $8,000 federal tax credit.”

Sales activity in the lower-price categories gradually stimulates sales in other categories as sellers who want to become trade-up buyers are able to sell their current homes.

Forward-looking factors also indicate an improving market: REALTORS® filed 3,412 new contracts in the month of April, nearly double than the number of contracts that were filed in April 2008 (2,012), and are awaiting the closing of a record 5,818 pending sales. There were 103.90 percent more homes under contract last month than in April 2008 (2,853).

The 1,741 completed closings in April is a 41.43 percent increase compared to April 2008 (1,231) and a 0.74 percent decrease compared to last month (1,754). Year to date, there have been 42.58 percent more sales than by this time last year (5,867 to 4,115).

The median price of all Orlando homes sold in April ($132,900) decreased by 37.01 percent compared to April 2008 while the area’s average interest rate increased to 4.86 percent, up from last month’s record low of 4.67 percent.

Of the 1,741 sales in April, 49.68 percent of the homes were either bank-owned (733) or distressed (132). The median price of the bank-owned homes sold in April was $89,900, while the median price of distressed homes was $146,000. The median price for the “normal” homes (876) sold in April was $161,245.

The area’s affordability index continues to nudge the 200 percent mark, 194.01 percent to be exact. (An affordability index of 99 percent means that buyers earning the state-reported median income are 1 percent short of the income necessary to purchase a median-priced home. Conversely, an affordability index that is over 100 means that median-income earners make more than is necessary to qualify for a median-priced home.) Buyers who earn the reported median income of $52,307 can qualify to purchase one of 11,233 homes in Orange and Seminole counties currently listed in the local multiple listing service (MLS) for $257,840 or less.

The first-time homebuyer affordability in Orlando is currently 137.96 percent. First-time buyers who earn the reported median income of $35,569 can qualify to purchase one of 7,027 homes in Orange and Seminole counties currently listed in the local multiple listing service (MLS) for $155,850 or less.

Homes of all types spent an average of 104 days on the market before being sold in April 2009, and the average home sold for 93.14 percent of its listing. In April 2008 those numbers were 120 and 93.18 percent, respectively.

The majority of single-family homes (153) that changed hands in April 2009 were sold in the $200,000 – $250,000 price range. Eight hundred eighty-seven homes sold for less than $200,000 in April, and 159 sold for more than $300,000. On the far ends of the scale, 12 homes were sold for $1 million or more while 102 homes sold for less than $50,000.

Inventory

There are currently 20,194 homes available for purchase through the MLS. Inventory decreased by 1,254 homes from March 2009, which means that 1,254 more homes left the market than entered the market. Compared to last year, the April 2009 inventory level is 20.60 percent lower than it was in April 2008 (25,436).

The inventory level reflects an 11.60-month supply at the current pace of sales, which is down from the 12.23-month supply recorded in March 2009 and equal to the pace during the last quarter of 2006. Altogether, inventory months-of-supply has declined 5.15 percent since January 2009.

There are 14,472 single-family homes currently listed in the MLS, a number that is 4,579 (24.04 percent) less than this time last year. As usual, most (1,755) are listed in the $200,000 – $250,000 price range. Condos currently make up 3,928 offerings in the MLS, while duplexes/town homes/villas make up the remaining 1,794. Most condos (622) are priced below $50,000; the majority of duplexes/town homes/villas (273) are listed in the $120,000 – $140,000 price category.

Condos and Town Homes/Duplexes/Villas

The sales of condos in the Orlando area have increased by 167.52 percent (down from last month’s massive increase of 252.22 percent). A total of 313 condos changed hands in April of this year compared to 117 in April 2008. Nine hundred eighty-three condos have sold to date this year, a 138.01 percent increase over last year’s 413.

The most (148) condos in a single price category that changed hands were in the $1 – $50,000 price range, again nearly three times the number (49) that were sold in the next most populated category ($50,000 – $60,000).
Orlando homebuyers purchased 148 duplexes, town homes, and villas in April 2009, which is a 23.33 percent increase from April 2008 when 120 of these alternative housing types were purchased. The majority (29) of duplexes, town homes, and villas sold in April 2009 fell into the $100,000 – $120,000 price category.

MSA Numbers

Sales of existing homes within the Orlando MSA (Lake, Orange, Osceola, and Seminole counties) in April were up by 48.26 percent when compared to April of last year. Throughout the entire MSA, 2,178 homes were sold in April 2009 compared with 1,469 in April 2008.

Each county’s year-to-date sales comparisons are as follows:

Lake: 24.67 percent above 2008 (1,142 homes sold to date in 2009 compared to 916 in 2008);
Orange: 64.37 percent above 2008 (3,889 homes sold to date in 2009 compared to 2,366 in 2008);
Osceola: 105.54 percent above 2008 (1,410 homes sold to date in 2009 compared to 686 in 2008); and
Seminole: 6.74 percent above 2008 (1,030 sold to date in 2009 compared to 965 in 2008).

For detailed statistical reports, please visit http://www.orlrealtor.com and click on Housing Statistics on the top menu bar. This representation is based in whole or in part on data supplied by the Orlando Regional Realtor® Association or its Multiple Listing Service (MLS). Neither the Association nor its MLS guarantees or is in any way responsible for its accuracy. Data maintained by the Association or its MLS may not reflect all real estate activity in the market. Due to late closings, an adjustment is necessary to record those closings posted after our reporting date.

ORRA Realtor® sales, referred to as the core market, represent all sales by members of the Orlando Regional Realtor® Association, not necessarily those sales strictly in Orange and Seminole counties. Note that statistics released each month may be revised in the future as new data is received.

Orlando MSA numbers reflect sales of homes located in Orange, Seminole, Osceola, and Lake counties by members of any Realtor® association, not just members of ORRA.

Statistics on the sales of area homes that are sold without the assistance of a Realtor® are available in the Real Estate Index, a report produced jointly by ORRA and the Real Estate Attorney’s Fund.

Copyright © 2009 Orlando Regional Realtor® Association.
All rights reserved.

h1

Less is More…Smaller Homes Thrive and Survive

December 8, 2008

This may be the one time in history where you will see the return of smaller homes. Eco-conscious buyers are now more concerned with keeping costs down, reducing energy usage and affordable home prices. To some, this is called “Frugal Chic” and you will see more of it in the near future.

As recent article in the Seattle Times (http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=20020324&slug=newhomecottage24) shared about this emerging market.

I predict they are correct. Gen X & Y buyers are not as concerned with size as they are with space planning and affordability. Seniors moving down are more interested in having homes they can easily manage.

In addition, all you have to do is go to an IKEA store and see what they can do with 200 square feet of living space to know that the next generation of buyers may be very happy with well designed small spaces. IKEA is overrun with buyers on any given day of the week.

Builders are already adjusting to the new demand and buyers will respond. It’s a good thing.

PS: Look for luxury buyers to also accept smaller living spaces in prestigious locations – it’s already happening in trendy places around the country. Frugal Chic is here to stay.